"The ordinary acts we practice every day at home are of more importance to the soul than their simplicity might suggest."

Thomas Moore

Friday, June 26, 2015

Tale of a Hussif ~ day 5 reveal...

It's made and the soft smile on my face shows no sign of diminishing in the near future.
This was a peaceful, satisfying, creative and beautiful project to put my heart and hands to work upon, my own little piece of sewing history that can be passed down to future generations in my family line...

About mid-July I'll share a step by step tutorial on the blog for making this hussif/huswif.
The embroideries in my hussif are available through The Stitchery Club (here) or as a pdf pattern set in my shop from July 17th.

To see my  progress making the hussif over the last week click here and scroll down through the five blog posts.
 

Have you enjoyed this week of 'hussif watching' and hussif history?
Personally, it has given me an increased appreciation for what we are able to source, purchase and make from needle and thread in the 21st Century!

In Regency times when the first little 'houswives', 'hussifs' and 'huswifs' were being made, sewing tools such as needle, pins and thread were very expensive, so many a woman would carry her hussif tied securely under her apron so as not to lose it.

Looking at my many boxes of pretty threads, a pile of needle packets, pearl ended pins and shelves of fabric, I feel a little ashamed that I take the acquisition of these notions for granted.
There's a new gratitude blooming around here now.

To close out this week let's have a look at some very old embellished hussifs, those which were no doubt labours of love. They were all made in the 1880's...





(the four photos above were found on Pinterest)

Let us each take a little time today for a moment of gratitude when we pick up our needle and work on projects that may one day be shown to fresh eyes as examples of what needlewomen made 'back in the day'....

hugs

34 comments:

  1. I have enjoyed reading this week and some of the history you listed is in my neck of the woods, so to speak. Your Hussif is adorable! You are so talented with your hands as well as with your words. I am off to stitch a Christmas ornament for the anticipated addition to my niece's family. I so enjoy all of my stitching stash and most thankful for it.

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  2. This week has been quite enjoyable watching your progress and learning about historical hussifs. Your completed hussif is truly a labor of love and a dreamy vision of practical necessity for all who stitch with needle and thread. I LOVE your "modern" version and the fabrics and design you have created. This is something I will be making for myself...hopefully sooner than later. Blessings and Stitching Bliss Dear...

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  3. It is just so gorgeous Jenny, I will definitely be making one of these to hand down to my grand children etc, what a wonderful think to have.....

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  4. Wow, gorgeous work! Thanks for the history lesson and inspiration ... I may just consider also making one as an heirloom too :) - Rose, ChCh, NZ

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  5. I read your post with great interest. What a history as needleworkers we share. I once found at a thrift shop a knitter's home made holder she had sewn for her knitting needles. Hand stitched with great care. I had to buy it even though I didn't need any more needles; I just wanted to keep it safe.

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  6. Stunning project, can't wait for next months instalment. thanks for another beautiful project.

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  7. Your hussif looks so pretty and the history behind the old ones was very interesting. May you have many happy hours using yours.

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  8. Hi Jenny, Your hussif is absolutely beautiful. I have to make one and in Tilda fabrics too! LOL! Thank you for a wonderful week of interesting reading. Have a lovely weekend. Hugs, Christine xx

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  9. Hello Jenny! Your hussif is fabulous! I can't wait for the pattern.... I need to make at least one (probably more) of these! Have a lovely weekend! :) x

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  10. I've enjoyed following your posts on this beautiful project, Jenny. Your hussif is just perfect! I look forward to making one too. ☺

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  11. STUNNING! You can tell you have thoroughly enjoy yourself!

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  12. Das ist ja wunderschön und du hast das wiedermal super toll gestickt. Ich bewundere deine Arbeiten.
    Liebe Grüße Annerose

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  13. Your hussif is absolutely gorgeous! Thank you...

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  14. The loveliest finish ever, Jenny. It's so sweet, and so useful. I'm going to love seeing each one you make. I love the way you stage your photos, too. That lace wrapped spool has given me an idea for some wooden spools I bought to make something I never made. =) I look forward to the tutorial. My Year of Jenny stitching hasn't gone very well, so maybe July is the time to start over and re-energize on that!

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  15. Ann

    I just wanted to say that I have my Dads housewife from his time during World War 2, it is in very good condition and has obviously been used quite often.he was in the royal engineers and served in Europe, Asia and Africa his rank was that of a captain, he took his demon in East Africa where we joined him and then since my possession it has travelled to South East Asia, Europe and is finally back in the UK! So well travelled and I am sure will be cherished by one of my girls eventually, love ann

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  16. I love your hauswif, it is darling. I love reading all the information you gave and seeing the wonderful pictures! Hugs,

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  17. So lovely, Jenny! I've loved this post, learning about hussifs. I plan to try my hand at this as a gift for my daughter. Thank you for sharing!

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  18. Jenny, thank you for this wonderful week of learning Hussifs and seeing your progress with your little beauty! I will be waiting for the tutorial and all so I can make one or two myself! Hugs and Blessings

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  19. Jenny this week has been superb learning about the hussifs. Looking at photos of yours is so inspiring. I am really looking forward to more of your sharing projects! The photos of the older ones are spectacular! Thanks for sharing everything.

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  20. It's so beautiful, I love the colors and it was so nice to read the 5 parts of making.

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  21. I was very privileged to see this beautiful piece on Thursday. It is even more gorgeous than the pictures. Such lovely work with beautiful fabrics and laces.

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  22. Es una auténtica maravilla¡¡¡¡
    Besos

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  23. You do such beautiful work- I love it!

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  24. It is truly beautiful Jenny. Certainly yours is a labor of love just as the others you have shown us. Thank you for a wonderful week.

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  25. Your Hussite is so beautiful. I loved seeing the old ones too.

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  26. Wunderschön, einfach nur wunderschön !
    Liebe Grüße
    Käthe

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  27. Unos trabajos bellísimos Jenny!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Besos.

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  28. So beautiful Jenny. I love the soft femininity of it and all the little pockets for threads and scissors. The history has been really fascinating too. x

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  29. I am speechless - this is so gorgeous, hon, so very Jenny, a beautiful treasure to reflect the beautiful treasure that YOU are. I've loved reading the history and seeing all the old hussif's - but I love yours best.

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  30. This hussif is beautiful and amazing. I love it!!!
    Greetings
    Carolyn

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  31. Jenny, your hussif is absolutely beautiful, thank you for sharing your God given talents with us. Each week I look forward to reading your blog to see what you have come up with and I think this is the best yet, you can tell you have put yourself into this project whole heartedly. Your choice of colors and laces is perfect, I look forward to your tutorial and sewing along with you later in the month.

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It's always nice to receive feedback on a blog post, so *thank you* for taking time to comment!
I will try to reply via email unless you are a 'no reply blogger' which means you'll have to check for my reply in the comments. Of course, life is a rather hazardous activity, isn't it? So if I don't respond to your comment that's the reason why - life simply stepped in...
hugs
Jenny
x